Wide area monitoring and control challenges in the Nordic power system


Date: Wednesday, May 25                              Time: 10:30 am – 12:00 pm (CEST)


Name of the organizer: Salvatore D’Arco, Senior scientist

Organization: Sintef energy research, Norway

Email: salvatore.darco@sintef.no

Short biography of the chair: Salvatore D’Arco received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Naples “Federico II,” Naples, Italy, in 2002 and 2005, respectively. From 2006 to 2007, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. In 2008, he joined ASML, Veldhoven, the Netherlands, as a Power Electronics Designer consultant, where he worked until 2010. From 2010 to 2012, he was a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Electric Power Engineering at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim, Norway. In 2012, he joined SINTEF Energy Research where he currently works as a Senior Research Scientist. He is the author of more than 130 scientific papers and is the holder of one patent. His main research activities are related to control and analysis of power-electronic conversion systems for power system applications, including real-time simulation and rapid prototyping of converter control systems.

Panel Abstract: The panel will present wide area monitoring and control challenges in the nordic power system results and possible solutions obtained in Nordic cooperative projects. The panel will focus on WAMPACS and on the application of PMUs to improve the operation of the power system. The objective is to showcase research activities and development progress in the Nordic area.


Panelist 1:

Name: Robert Eriksson

Organization: Swedish National Grid (Svenska kraftnät), Sweden

Short biography: Robert Eriksson received the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, in 2005 and 2011, respectively. From 2013 to 2015, he held a position as an Associate Professor with Center for Electric Power and Energy, Technical University of Denmark – DTU, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark. He is currently Team Leader at the Swedish National Grid (Svenska kraftnät), Department of Power Systems. Since 2020, he holds a position as an Adjunct Professor at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology. His current research interests include power system dynamics and stability, automatic control, WAMS, and dc grids.

Title of presentation: Interarea oscillations and recent observations in the Nordic power system

Abstract: Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs) are installed to monitor inter-area and local power oscillations. Various sources excite oscillations in power systems and, too low damping or sustained oscillations may jeopardize the stability. Visualization tools and mitigation measures are needed to maintain the stability. The presentation will go through observations and key findings from recent events of natural and forced oscillations seen in the Nordic power system.


Panelist 2:

Name: Knut Hornnes

Organization: Statnett, Norway

Short biography: MSc and PhD in Electrical Engineering from NTNU in 1983 and 1995 respectively. From 1984 to 2001 he worked at SINTEF Energy Research with optimization models and system analysis in Nordic and European power systems. The PhD thesis was focused on integration of market models and power flow models. From 2001 to 2011 he worked in Powel, now Volue, as consultant and developing of optimization models for hydropower. From 2011 he have worked at the Norwegian TSO Statnett with power system development and operation, both in Norway and in the Nordic synchronous system. He have also attended various work groups within Entso-E.

Title of presentation: An introduction to the NEWEPS project as a joint Nordic initiative

Abstract: MSc and PhD in Electrical Engineering from NTNU in 1983 and 1995 respectively. From 1984 to 2001 he worked at SINTEF Energy Research with optimization models and system analysis in Nordic and European power systems. The PhD thesis was focused on integration of market models and power flow models. From 2001 to 2011 he worked in Powel, now Volue, as consultant and developing of optimization models for hydropower. From 2011 he have worked at the Norwegian TSO Statnett with power system development and operation, both in Norway and in the Nordic synchronous system. He have also attended various work groups within Entso-E.


Panelist 3:

Name: Sigurd Jakobsen

Organization: SINTEF Energy Research, Norway

Short biography: Sigurd Hofsmo Jakobsen is currently a researcher at SINTEF Energy Research (2013-. He received his master degree from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) on modelling of power electronic in 2013 and his PhD in electric power engineering at NTNU in 2019. His research interests include power system reliability, stability and model validation.

Title of presentation: Model learning for power system operation

Abstract: In the Sparc project model learning is used for localising the source of forced oscillations. Some initial findings are presented as well as outlines for further work.


Panelist 4:

Name: Lars Nordström

Organization: KTH – The Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden

Short biography: Lars Nordström is Professor in Information Systems for Power System Control at KTH – The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. He is head of the division of Electric Power and Energy Systems at KTH and deputy head of the school of electrical engineering and computer science, with specific responsibility for faculty development. His research and teching is focused on issues at the crossroads of control, communication and power systems. His research interests include future architectures, functionality and quality aspects of Information and communication systems used for power system control, operation, automation and protection. He has served as director of the Swedish centre of Electric Power Engineering and as Thematic leader for Smartgrids and electric storage in KIC InnoEnergy In 2014 he was visiting professor at Washington State University. He is the author of 100+ scientific papers in journals and international conferences, a senior member of the IEEE, CIRED and Cigre.

Title of presentation: SPARC project: Automated identification of distribution grid equivalent models from PMU streams

Abstract: Offline use of PMU data to validate models of power system components improves dynamic studies of power systems by enhancing the models of components. Given the dynamic nature of active distribution grids, equivalent models of such grids may need frequent updating to accommodate changes in generation and possibly even topology. In the SPARC project a method that sequentially processes PMU data to identify system events and classify them as informative or noninformative for model identification and parameter estimation has been developed. The method provides automatic updating of distribution grid dynamic equivalents and estimated parameters thereby providing up to date dynamic equivalents for power system dynamic analysis.


Panelist 5:

Name: Seppänen Janne

Organization: Aalto University, Finland

Short biography: Janne Seppänen received the M.Sc. (Eng.) and D.Sc. (Tech.) degrees in electrical engineering from Aalto University, Finland, in 2011 and 2017, respectively. Currently, he is working as a Professor of Practice at Aalto University, Espoo, Finland, and as a Senior Expert at Fingrid Oyj Strategic Grid Planning unit, Helsinki, Finland. Previously, he has worked in several different roles at Fingrid Oyj and at ABB Corporate Research in Switzerland. His main research interests are related to power system dynamics and stability, transmission system planning and analysis as well as transmission system operation and control.

Title of presentation: Changing power system dynamics with converter connected generation – observations and challenges

Abstract: Fingrid’s observations on how the large increase of wind power is affecting the system properties: varying inertia, changing oscillatory dynamics, control instability of wind power (e.g. with low system short circuit power near large wind power parks).